http://berlin.inyourpocket.com In Your Pocket travel writer Andrew Quested in front of the Reichstag, Germany’s parliament in Berlin. The name together with its monumental size make most people associate Germany’s neoclassical parliamentary building with the Nazis, but Hitler and his party have little history here. After hosting parliamentary sessions since 1894, one month after Hitler was appointed chancellor in January 1933, it was set on fire by Dutch communist Marinus van der Lubbe. In the years during which it abutted the Wall as a conference centre, West Berliners played football on its lawn, while later artist Christo famously wrapped it in cloth. It did not serve as parliament again until a reunited German government returned to Berlin in 1999. Renovated by Sir Norman Foster, this building is perhaps the most public federal building in the world through its glass-dome tourist attraction. On the rooftop, photographs documenting the building’s history circle the rim above the parliament chamber. Two ramps spiral up the side of the dome, an engineering feat even more fascinating than the panoramic view from the top. Avoid long queues by arriving early or late, or by booking at the Dachgarten restaurant. More info here: http://berlin.inyourpocket.com/sightseeing/mainsights/venue/23086-Reichstag_Bundestag.html