Poland travel guide, Poland travel vlog, Poland tourism & vacations, Local people & culture in Poland, Visit Poland cities Travel Videos (Subscribe Now) 🔔https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZA8CQtDTrwHnvZrbpZkkiw?sub_confirmation=1 Even though the country is more than 1,000 years old, Poland’s survival is something of a miracle. Its boundaries were continually redrawn over the course of eight centuries. Then suddenly the nation disappeared from the map. Between 1795 and 1918, Poland, wedged in the middle of Europe, ceased to exist for the world’s cartographers. Partitioned for a third time at the end of the 18th century by Prussia, Austria and Russia, Poland was reduced to a promise and a prayer for Poles, and the object of tug-of-war for more powerful states. But that was only one aspect of Poland’s troubles; then the real tragedy occurred. Hitler and the Nazis invaded Poland, launching World War II, then extinguished many of its cities and eradicated 20 percent of its people, including nearly its entire Jewish population of three-and-a-half million – until then the largest Jewish community in Europe. Wars have befallen many countries in modern times, but few have been as thoroughly ravaged as Poland. Yet Poland rebuilt itself from the rubble of war. From photographs, paintings, architectural drawings and the memories of its grief-stricken survivors, Poles reconstructed the Old Towns of Warsaw and Gdansk brick by brick, only to suffer four decades of Soviet-imposed Communist rule and grudging submission behind the Iron Curtain. Yet Poland asserted itself once more. In the 1980s, the trade union movement Solidarity (Solidarnosc) helped to trigger the demise of Communism in Poland and throughout the Soviet bloc. Poland has survived with its culture, language, spirit and most of its territory intact, and in 2004 it joined the European Union, as a modern, independent nation. Population and Religion ==================== Poland is a nation of a little under 39 million, the size of Spain. Its people are fervently Catholic – over 80 percent call themselves practising Catholics – and more conservative than many of their Western European neighbours. Throughout most of its history, Poland was an intensely cosmopolitan place, with Germans, Jews, Lithuanians, Belarusians, Armenians and others living within its borders. During the Second Republic (1919–39), only two-thirds of its people were ethnic Poles. It has also traditionally been a land of religious tolerance. When medieval Europe was rocked by religious wars, Poland was a safe haven for Jewish, Protestant and Orthodox refugees – making the intolerance later inflicted by Germany on Polish territory all the more terrible. Today, Poland is unusually homogenous in terms of ethnicity: some 98 percent of the people are Poles. The Jewish population was reduced to 250,000 after World War II, and today there are only a few thousand Jews living in Poland. The largest minority groups are Lithuanians, Ukrainians and Belarusians. Literacy rates are high, at a shade under 100 percent. Poles are well-educated, and young people in the larger cities speak English (much more so than German or Russian) with the same fluency and enthusiasm of those a couple of border lines west. They’re up-to-date on fashions, trends and music; they have mobile phones glued to their ears and e-mail accounts they tap into daily at internet cafés across the country. A Blend of East and West ====================== Poland’s history as a territory coveted by great powers all around it ensured that the north–south divisions often seen elsewhere are, here, primarily east–west divisions. The west is more Germanic, organised, pragmatic and industrious, while the East has a reputation of being more Russian – which means, in short, relaxed, cultural and introspective. Poznan, for example, halfway between Berlin and Warsaw, revels in its business skills and organisational attitude. Kraków, the ancient capital much closer to Ukraine than Germany, is just as proud of its free-flowing cultural prowess and its status as a place where art and education override business (except, of course, for the business of tourism). There has always been a cultural struggle between East and West in Poland. The Poles are a Slavic people, like their Ukrainian and Russian neighbours to the east. Yet their historical and cultural connections to the West are formidable. The Catholic Poles first took their religious cues from the West in the 10th century, and cultural epochs basic to Western Europe – the Enlightenment and the Renaissance, for example – were just as much a part of Polish society. The shared identity, as well as the uneasy conflicts, between East and West, have defined this land in ways that go far beyond geography.
burden in Warsaw Krakow Prague and
Budapest five cities five fascinating
places torn apart by World War two and
then hidden behind the iron curtain of
communism this is something we don’t
really know but we don’t really realize
the march of Poland went through
[Music]
this Eastern Europe thing has been on
our bucket list for a long time so far
it’s in just the thing for us the people
of Eastern Europe are now free on a
journey through their lands
what can you look forward to
never imagined it would be like this
[Music]
Warsaw is the capital of Poland she is
sometimes called the Phoenix city
because she was completely destroyed
during World War two and then rebuilt
with the heroic efforts of the Polish
citizens it’s our first full day and
Warsaw
beautiful day warm sunny very nice too
would be potato and cottage cheese and
two of the sour is so sweet but he’s so
jolly he’s always up and he makes you
feel good and he is very knowledgeable
English yes he has a good really good
the explanation we had by our tour guide
as he talked about his own family and
his own upbringing and I really enjoyed
that that was very informative you’re
not just hearing about some King from
200 years ago or some uprising it’s how
it affected his family and I also like
to share my experience I’m also very
proud of my country and I like to show
them a little bit of this
I like Christian he’s very open he’s
very friendly and he’s there to answer
our questions especially I love history
and he’s there to help us and so I’ve
enjoyed learning from him and the plan
for today is to go and see a little bit
of the city of also our guide is Philip
he lives here in Wausau and
knows all the places here around the age
of six the small boy started to play
piano at the age of seven he started to
compose his first music nothing special
at the age of nine he was already better
than his teachers so he started to
compose his first real polyneices
mazurkas Nocturne sonatas and all the
other compositions that you can enjoy
now we’re looking at the tree of the
ship and blowing and we were just
discussing his love for nature
[Music]
shortly after the German invasion of
Poland in September 1939 more than
400,000 Jews in Warsaw were confined to
little more than 1 square miles of the
city this became known as the Warsaw
Ghetto in November of 1940 the ghetto
was sealed off by brick walls barbed
wire and armed guards anyone caught
leaving was shot on sight
the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising in April and
May of 1943 inspired other revolts in
ghettos and concentration camps
throughout German occupied Eastern
Europe
the uprising started on the 1st of
August 44 and it lasted for 63 days so
more than two months 150,000 civilians
who died and 48 thousand soldiers I’m
learning so much and I have a new
appreciation for Polish history
my mother was Polish and her parents are
from Poland yeah and your first time in
Poland first time in Poland it’s like
being home
we’re having our home hosted supper it’s
a great family here were having a good
time
the neighbors are over practicing their
English and staying over to the our
charming
I would like to welcome you in our home
I’m Alan Costas this is my family we
have animals horses don’t with pickaxes
pick a sheep that’s wonderful
I think after dinner we can go outside
and walking the grounds of the State
Museum of Auschwitz Birkenau the largest
world war ii camp can be a deeply moving
experience
many people were systematically murdered
here by the Nazis mostly Jews but also
Roma Jehovah Witnesses homosexuals and
the disabled some estimate that we are
at a point in history when at least one
aging survivor of the Holocaust dies
every hour each day meeting families
that have been directly touched by this
dark power of European and world history
is unforgettable
[Music]
Berlin Warsaw Krakow Prague and Budapest
five cities five fascinating places torn
apart by world war two and then hidden
behind the iron curtain of communism
this is something we don’t really know I
know but we don’t really realize the
hardship Poland went through
[Music]
this Eastern Europe thing has been on
our bucket list for a long time and so
far it’s in just the thing for us the
people of Eastern Europe are now free on
a journey through their lives
what can you look forward to
[Music]
and never imagined it would be like this
[Music]
Warsaw is the capital of Poland she is
sometimes called the Phoenix city
because she was completely destroyed
during World War two and then rebuilt
with the heroic efforts of the Polish
citizens it’s our first full day and
Warsaw beautiful day warm sunny very
nice
two would be potato and cottage cheese
and two would be sour he is so sweet but
he’s so jolly he’s yet always up and he
makes you feel good and he’s very
knowledgeable English yes he has a good
really good the explanation we had by
our tour guide as he talked about his
own family and his own upbringing and I
really enjoyed that that was very
informative
you’re not just hearing about some King
from 200 years ago or some uprising it’s
how it affected his family and I also
like to share my experience I’m also
very proud of my country and I like to
show them a little bit of this
I like Christian he’s very open he’s
very friendly and he’s there to answer a
question especially I love history and
he’s there to help us and so I’ve
enjoyed learning from him the plan for
today is to go and see a little bit of
the city of also our guide is Philip he
lives Q in Wausau and he knows all the
places used around
at the age of six the small boy started
to play piano at the age of seven he
started to compose his first music
nothing special at the age of nine he
was already better than his teachers so
he started to compose his first real
polyneices mazurkas Nocturne sonatas and
all the other compositions that you can
enjoy now we’re looking at the tree of
the ship and blowing and we were just
discussing his love for nature
[Music]
shortly after the German invasion of
Poland in September 1939 more than
400,000 Jews in Warsaw were confined to
little more than 1 square miles of the
city this became known as the Warsaw
Ghetto in November of 1940 the ghetto
was sealed off by brick walls barbed
wire and armed guards anyone caught
leaving was shot on sight the Warsaw
Ghetto Uprising in April and May of 1943
inspired other revolts in ghettos and
concentration camps throughout German
occupied Eastern Europe
the uprising started on the 1st of
August 44 and it lasted for 63 days
supported two months 150,000 civilians
who died and 48 thousand soldiers I’m
learning so much and I have a new
appreciation for Polish history my
mother was Polish and her parents are
from Paula yeah first time in Poland
first time in Poland it’s like being
home
we’re having our home hosted supper it’s
a great family here we’re having a good
time
the neighbors are over
had a long productive day looking
forward to tomorrow the countries of
this remarkable journey Germany Poland
the Czech Republic and Hungary a past
present and future revealed
it’s a learning experience and thank you
grand circle I live in the northern part
of Poland
I’ve always loved to travel since I was
a kid
fabulous thing to travel to learn about
the different cultures and this is why
I’m here when I was my mother’s belly I
was always moving she said this shoe she
had a square belly you know so I could
never stay in one place I was always
curious about how it is and when I was
when I was born I was smiling they
thought there is something wrong with me
I saw the community stems from the
child’s perspective you’ve seen the
propaganda movies how everything looks
so perfect and then you go into a shop
and the shelves are completely empty
people were queuing for days and when
you get finally there to the counter you
don’t know if there is anything there if
you heard the gossip that something is
in the end of the city it can be a pair
you know like shoes one size everybody
would go there because there is always
some family member who will fit these
shoes or if they don’t fit it they will
put some newspaper and something that
they fit
[Music]
I feel lucky that I have lived through
it without also feeling lucky that it
has changed and now everything is
available
[Music]
people in Poland we are very proud of
our nation we are very warm we are very
welcome and you can really feel it when
you’re there so I’m sure that at this
point I have convinced you to come to
Eastern Europe and I’m hoping to see you
soon